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    ISSUES

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In many ways, the petroleum industry is large and complex with issues that span the globe and are of world wide import. Other issues affecting or resulting from oil and gas development are more local in nature and mainly concern local communities right here at home. UPA works to be an advocate for the oil and gas industry in Utah and represent member companies in the numerous issues of import that impact both industry and Utah communities.

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Air Quality

After the safety of our employees and communities where we operate, environmental stewardship is a top priority for UPA Members and Utah's oil and gas industry.

Gas Prices

Fuel prices affect us all. Whether you drive for a living or hardly at all, the price of gasoline can significantly affect our family budget, vacation plans or corporate fleet costs.

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Tier 3 Fuels

EPA’s Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standard rule is designed to reduce air pollution from passenger cars and trucks.

Economic Impact

Utah's oil and gas industry has a tremendous economic impact on the State.

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Hydraulic Fracturing

Over the past decade, the United States has seen a renaissance in energy development. New and improved technologies have unlocked oil and gas resources that previously were inaccessible.

Refinery Safety

Operating our facilities in a safe fashion is our top priority as an industry. Our employees are our most important asset and sending them home safely each day is the most important thing we do.

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Public Lands

Utah is blessed with some of the most beautiful and scenic landscapes in all the world. Many of these lands deserve special protection for our enjoyment and that of generations to come, but for many lands, the highest and best use is resource development.

Landowners

Utah is a checkerboard of different types of land and mineral ownership. One glance at a map showing who actually owns the surface of Utah’s lands will show the complexity this issue provides.

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Transportation

Oil, natural gas and refined petroleum products are transported across our State via truck, rail and most notably, pipelines.

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Air Quality

After the safety of our employees and communities where we operate, environmental stewardship is a top priority for UPA Members and Utah's oil and gas industry.

My Image

Fuel prices affect us all. Whether you drive for a living or hardly at all, the price of gasoline can significantly affect our family budget, vacation plans or corporate fleet costs.

My Image

Tier 3 Fuels

EPA’s Tier 3 Motor Vehicle Emission and Fuel Standard rule is designed to reduce air pollution from passenger cars and trucks.

My Image

Utah's oil and gas industry has a tremendous economic impact on the State.

My Image

Over the past decade, the United States has seen a renaissance in energy development. New and improved technologies have unlocked oil and gas resources that previously were inaccessible.

My Image

Operating our facilities in a safe fashion is our top priority as an industry. Our employees are our most important asset and sending them home safely each day is the most important thing we do.

My Image

Utah is blessed with some of the most beautiful and scenic landscapes in all the world. Many of these lands deserve special protection for our enjoyment and that of generations to come, but for many lands, the highest and best use is resource development.

My Image

Utah is a checkerboard of different types of land and mineral ownership. One glance at a map showing who actually owns the surface of Utah’s lands will show the complexity this issue provides.

My Image

Oil, natural gas and refined petroleum products are transported across our State via truck, rail and most notably, pipelines.

    • As of 2015, Utah ranks 11th nationally in oil production and 12th among states in natural gas production.
    • There are currently 141 operating refineries in the United States with 5 located in Utah. Utah refineries produced over 36 million barrels (1.5 billion gallons) of motor gasoline in 2015 and over 19 million barrels (798 million gallons) of distillate fuel (diesel).
    • Well completions in Utah (both oil and gas) have declined dramatically over recent years as commodity prices plummeted and have stayed low. There were 1243 completions in 2008, 925 in 2014 and only 305 in 2015.
    • Duchesne (46%), Uintah (34%) and San Juan (12%) Counties accounted for 92% of oil production in Utah in 2015. The balance was produced collectively from Sevier, Grand, Summit, Carbon and Emery Counties.
    • The ratio of oil wells drilled in Utah versus natural gas wells has shifted significantly over recent years as commodity prices have affected company's drilling programs. In 2008, only 28% of wells drilled were for oil while in 2014, 76% of all wells drilled were primarily seeking oil.
    • Wages for energy-related jobs are nearly double the average annual wage for all employment in Utah.
    • In 2015 petroleum products and natural gas accounted for 59% of total energy consumed in Utah. Coal was responsible for 38% while all renewables combined made up 3% of energy use.
    • Utah refineries received record amounts of crude oil in 2014 and only slightly less in 2015, with 43% coming from in-state and 8% coming from Canada.
    • Fossil fuels made up 98% of Utah’s total energy production in 2015, while renewable sources accounted for only 2% of Utah’s production portfolio.
    • Property taxes charged against Utah oil and gas activities have increased more than six times since 1996, totaling nearly $64 million in 2015.
    • The value of crude oil produced in Utah reached an all-time inflation-adjusted high of $3.2 billion in 2014, but then dropped to only $1.5 billion in 2015 as commodity prices sank.
    • Natural gas production in Utah reached a record high in 2012 of 491 billion cubic feet, but has since dropped to 423 billion cubic feet in 2015.
    • Oil and gas operations in Utah account for about 1.3% of the State's gross state product. Utilities (including some non-energy sectors), refineries, and pipeline transportation and maintenance account for an additional 1.9%.
    • The last major refinery built in the United States was put into operation in 1977.
    • Utah’s average price of residential natural gas in 2015 was $9.72 per thousand cubic feet, the 17th lowest in the nation. As recently as 2011, Utah’s price was the third lowest in the nation, but new natural gas pipelines have better connected our once captive market with the rest of the United States.
    • Natural gas is the largest source of annual energy production in Utah, surpassing coal for the first time in 2010.
    • In 2015, 76% of the electricity generated in Utah was from coal-burning power plants. Electricity generation from natural-gas power plants more than doubled since 2007, increasing its total share in 2015 to 19%.
    • Utah produced 18% more energy than it consumed in 2015, continuing its status as a net-energy exporter. This percentage is usually closer to 30%, but production of fossil fuels was significantly down in 2015.
    • Energy-related employment in Utah declined to 15,367 in September of 2015 (down 16% from the 18,236 recorded in October 2014 prior to the oil price crash), of which the majority (30%) came from the oil and gas sector.
    • Average yearly wages in the energy sector ($83,400, first three quarters of 2015) are more than double the statewide average annual wage ($41,500, first three quarters of 2015).

UPA's voice is strengthened by companies like yours joining forces with us to work towards maintaining and improving Utah's favorable business climate.

Thanks to UPA's Chairman's Circle Sponsors

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